TEI by Example Module 0: Introduction to Text Encoding and the TEI Ron Van den Branden Edward Vanhoutte Melissa Terras Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing (ALLC) Centre for Data, Culture and Society, University of Edinburgh, UK Centre for Digital Humanities (CDH), University College London, UK Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH), King’s College London, UK Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document Studies (CTB) , Royal Academy of Dutch Language and Literature, Belgium
Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document Studies (CTB) Royal Academy of Dutch Language and Literature Koningstraat 18 9000 Gent Belgium
ctb@kantl.be
Edward Vanhoutte Melissa Terras
Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document Studies (CTB) , Royal Academy of Dutch Language and Literature, Belgium Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document Studies (CTB) , Royal Academy of Dutch Language and Literature, Belgium Gent
Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document Studies (CTB) Royal Academy of Dutch Language and Literature Koningstraat 18 9000 Gent Belgium

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

9 July 2010
TEI by Example. Edward Vanhoutte editor Ron Van den Branden editor Melissa Terras editor

Digitally born

TEI by Example offers a series of freely available online tutorials walking individuals through the different stages in marking up a document in TEI (Text Encoding Initiative). Besides a general introduction to text encoding, step-by-step tutorial modules provide example-based introductions to eight different aspects of electronic text markup for the humanities. Each tutorial module is accompanied with a dedicated examples section, illustrating actual TEI encoding practise with real-life examples. The theory of the tutorial modules can be tested in interactive tests and exercises.

en-GB integrated examples in a single file
OpenDocument Format

The same document can be encoded in the OpenDocument Format, an XML encoding scheme for representing electronic documents such as spreadsheets, charts, presentations and word processing documents, that can be interpreted by (desktop) publishing systems such as the Open Office software suite. Notice that, despite ODF being expressed in XML, there are many similarities to the LaTeX approach in the previous example. ODF is a procedural encoding scheme as well, providing an XML vocabulary to describe different formatting styles. The text itself is encoded in a office:text element, in which several structural elements are distinguished: headings, paragraphs, footnotes, each with their own associated rendering instructions in the form of styles. All italicised text is represented in the encoding, with references to different style definitions that are responsible for rendering the text italic in the output. Here, too, there is no way of indicating that the visually unmarked Goethe is a proper name.

Review Die Leiden des jungen Werther 1 by Goethe is an exceptionally good example of a book full of Weltschmerz . An OpenDocument example